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Importance of Iodine

Importance of IodineIodine (I) is essential, which clearly means we need it. Just as we need zinc or magnesium, we need I. The common iodine deficiency disorders include goiter, hypothyroidism, mental retardation, reproductive impairment, and decreased child survival; however that short group is only the beginning of health problems with a lack of iodine. The recent meltdown of the nuclear power stations in Japan may have highlighted the urgent need for Iodine, but even though the threat has passed, the health requirement for I has not diminished. It’s even more important than we have been led to believe.

David Derry MD PhD, “Fibrocystic disease of the breast consists of small or large, sometimes painful lumps in women’s breasts. It varies in the way it shows—not only in different women, but also because it changes from month to month in the same women. Medical doctors generally believe that fibrocystic disease results from the excess number of cells that grow in the breast during the menstrual cycle from the hormonal stimulation.

“Since the number of cells increases in the breast during the cycle, some of the cells have to be removed to restore the normal condition each month. Iodine is the trigger mechanism that causes excess cells to disappear to complete this normal process of cell death. Without enough iodine, the extra cells that develop during the menstrual cycle due to the hormonal stimulation do not resolve back to the normal breast architecture. These leftover cells build up over repeated cycles and cause the lumps, soreness, and larger lesions of fibrocystic disease.

“However, while about 90 percent of North American women have fibrocystic disease, about 40 percent of these women experience no symptoms. Their breasts may be normal to examination, but at that point the disease may be only microscopically detectable with a biopsy.

“Enough iodine enables the excess cells to be cleared out, and the breast to return to its normal resting state; the fibrocystic disease has slowly disappeared from the breast.

Nobel Laureate Albert Szent Györgyi, the physician who discovered Vitamin C in 1928, commented: “When I was a medical student, iodine in the form of KI (potassium iodide) was the universal medicine. Nobody knew what it did, but it did something and did something good. We students used to sum up the situation in this little rhyme:

If ye don’t know where, what, and why
prescribe ye then K and I”.

“Iodine remains the perfect antiseptic with the least side effects of all time. As a perfect antiseptic killing all single-celled organisms, there has to be a common mechanism of a single element like iodine.

“This is part of a general thesis that both iodine and thyroid hormone act as a team to provide a constant surveillance against abnormal cell development, including carcinogenic chemicals that can spread cancer cells within the body.

“Iodine appears to have several more roles in the body. Iodine protects against abnormal growth of bacteria in the stomach (helicobacter pylori is the most clinically significant). Iodine can coat incoming allergic proteins to make them non-allergic; It also deactivates all biological and most chemical poisons in the stomach.

“”I propose that…iodine and thyroid hormones act as a team to provide a constant surveillance against abnormal cell development and the spread of cancer cells within the body including chemicals that are carcinogenic” writes Dr. Derry, who, in addition to holding an MD, also has a PhD in neurochemistry and is a former University of Toronto Medical Research Council Scholar.  “Cancer grows so slowly when using iodine and thyroid hormone therapy that the cancer will not affect the lives of the patients who have it. The treatment is non-invasive, inexpensive and safe.”

Dr.  Derry also credits iodine with several other roles in the body: It protects against abnormal growth of bacteria in the stomach.  It detoxifies chemicals, food poisoning, snake venom, etc. It coats incoming allergic proteins to make them non-allergic, and probably defuses autoimmune disease mechanisms in the same way.

How much iodine is enough? It has been shown that daily doses of iodine above two to three milligrams per day (about half a drop of Lugols from a standard eyedropper) saturate the thyroid within a couple of weeks. At this point, the thyroid gland stops taking up iodine. This means that at a dietary intake above two to three milligrams, all of the iodine goes to all its other functions in the body, such as killing off abnormal cells.

BodyBio has been marketing Iodine for ~10 years, but after extensive testing has added a Liquid Iodine Taste Testing Kit to its famous Liquid Mineral line. This is the absolute best way to take Iodine safely (or any essential mineral) — taste it first. Use your own taste buds to see if you even need it to begin with. We do that for all the trace minerals (which we desperately need) and guess what – Iodine, if anything, is another essential mineral. There’s no reason that we should not rely on our sense of taste for Iodine just as we have for them all.

Dr Derry suggests about half a drop of Lugols solution. That’s equivalent to ~36 drops of BodyBio Iodine (~2.4 mgs of potassium iodide), very close to a ½ drop of Lugol’s. Why reinvent the wheel, follow the expert’s advice as suggested in Dr. Derry’s book; available on Amazon “Breast Cancer and Iodine: How to Prevent and How to Survive Breast Cancer”.

BOOK-BreastCancer-IodinewebAny good Iodine supplement such as  Lugols®, Iodoral®, or BodyBio Iodine # 9, will suffice. However, BodyBio alone guides you to recognize when you have filled up your Iodine stores, when you have enough. Simply by putting 36 drops of BodyBio Iodine in 8 ounces of filtered water you have created your personal testing solution. Just a taste of the solution is enough to guide you. If it has a pleasant taste (hmm good), or, if there is no taste (plain water) – you need it. If the taste is strong or disturbing – do not take it. It does not get any simpler.  http://www.bodybio.com/BodyBio/docs/BodyBioBulletin-LiquidMinerals.pdf.

You can now fill up your Iodine bucket (or any of the essential minerals that we require). If it’s low (most everyone will be), take 36 drops per day and add that into your daily mineral drink. Please check your taste response often, at least weekly, to avoid taking an excess of I or any mineral you do not need. This is too important to put off. Call BodyBio at 888 320 8338 and order the New BodyBio Iodine Test Kit – do it today.   

iodine-samples

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.
These products are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease.

The Importance of Healthy Kidneys

kidney-modelBert Lance, who worked for Jimmy Carter in the Budget office, is credited with saying, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” as cited in the May 1977 issue of the magazine Nation’s Business. Sometimes we carry this admonition too far, as when we ignore body parts that don’t hurt. Not everything that’s out of order lets us know right away. It’s a lot easier to prevent damage than to fix it; just as changing the oil in your car prevents an exorbitant repair bill. The same applies to your body. Preventing ailments is easier and less painful than fixing them. Except for stones, the kidneys pretty much mind their own business, seldom letting us know they’re even there. A little maintenance goes a long way. Many people don’t even know where in the body they are or what they do.

These bean-shaped organs, about the size of a fist, are near the middle of the back, just below the ribs, one on each side of the spine. And, boy oh boy, are they sophisticated reprocessing machines. They handle nearly fifty gallons of blood a day to filter about a half gallon of waste and excess water, which you already know is stored in the bladder. The wastes come from food leftovers that float in the blood after the food’s energy supplies have been used. If these wastes weren’t removed, they’d make us sick. The actual removal of the impurities occurs in the nephrons, which are the functional units of the kidney. Each kidney has more than a million nephrons, which have tiny blood vessels that help to remove the junk, including urea, uric acid, creatinine from muscles, and excess electrolytes. Normal proteins and other materials are kept in the bloodstream to be recycled for use by the body. This includes potassium, phosphorus and sodium, among others. The kidneys also release three vital hormones—erythropoietin to stimulate the marrow to make red blood cells, renin to control blood pressure, and calcitriol (the active form of vitamin D) to help maintain calcium for bones.

If kidney function were to fail by as much as thirty percent, you probably wouldn’t even know it. That’s one of the reasons why it’s measured on blood tests, looking at creatinine, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). The first of these comes from normal wear and tear on muscles; the second is an age-variable measure of how well the kidneys filter the wastes; and the third is a product of protein breakdown from the foods you eat. Proteins can also be monitored via urine. It is possible to survive with only one kidney, but living with two is nicer. If function drops to fifteen percent, either dialysis or a transplant may be necessary to sustain life.

There are things we can do to prevent kidney disorders. If there is a family history of diabetes or high blood pressure, tend to those right away. Glucose that stays in the blood instead of getting used for fuel can damage the nephrons. High BP distresses the tiny blood vessels of the nephrons, interfering with their function. Yes, there are medications to address these problems, but there also are a few dietary interventions that can keep the kidneys healthy.

Keeping sodium under control is necessary, especially as we age. Processed meals and meats contain large amounts of sodium, but so do restaurant foods, fast foods, soups and snacks. In some who are susceptible, sodium may spike BP.

The same oxygen that gives us life takes away molecular stability in the form of free radicals, which take turns stealing electrons from each other in a continuous cycle. Some come from the environment as pollution, and some from inside the body from burning food for energy. Supplying both the fat-soluble and water-soluble anti-oxidants from supplements is a good start, but that does not rule out the importance of the right diet, from which you can make the master anti-oxidant, glutathione.

Too much protein can tax the kidneys, particularly animal proteins. Mixing plant and animal sources is a safe bet. Whole grains and legumes can help. Depending on the condition of the body, however, protein intake in excess of protein need may or may not adversely affect the kidneys (Martin, 2005) (Knight, 2003). In the presence of a jeopardized kidney, elevated phosphorus levels can do harm. Meats and dairy are main sources, but food additives also contribute to the load. Phosphorus is an essential element in the diet, and in the form of phosphates is a major component of bone. It’s necessary for the manufacture of adenosine triphosphate to be burned for energy. Without it, metabolism of calcium, protein and glucose is upset. But an excess burdens the filtration load of the nephrons, and phosphate retention is linked to parathyroid malfunction.

Now, what do we eat?  Reducing sodium intake is simple. Just do it. More than 500 mg at a meal is pushing it, so you have to read labels. Canned soups can give you half a day’s worth in a single serving. You can swallow anti-oxidants from a bottle, but it’s helpful to get some from food. Berries are an excellent source, as are peppers, squashes and tomatoes. Cruciferous vegetables supply vitamin C, while onions offer quercetin, an anti-oxidant bioflavonoid that is also cardio-protective. Apples, with skins, are anti-inflammatory. Egg whites are a source of complete protein, having all the essential amino acids and less than a dozen milligrams of phosphorus. The omega-3 fats from cold-water fish—and from fish oil—can’t be beat for anti-inflammatory work (see http://oilofpisces.com/kidneydisorders.html) and olive oil is rich in polyphenols that inhibit inflammation and oxidation. A reliable research link for the study of kidney health is DaVita Clinical Research, http://www.davitaclinicalresearch.com/overview-mission.asp.

Water is an essential nutrient. Though we think that more is better, the truth is that more can be toxic. Drink too much and the kidneys can’t keep up. The cells get swollen beyond their capacity, sodium levels drop precipitously, and the firing of neurotransmitters short circuits, leading to headaches, fatigue, disorientation and even death. Thinking water will reduce protein blood test values, some people will overdo water intake and find that all they have done is dilute the protein. Even endurance athletes need to balance water intake with water loss.

A little prevention costs less than a plumber.

References

Berner YN, Shike M.
Consequences of phosphate imbalance.
Annu Rev Nutr. 1988;8:121-48.

Birn H.
The kidney in vitamin B12 and folate homeostasis: characterization of receptors for tubular uptake of vitamins and carrier proteins.
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2006 Jul;291(1):F22-36.

Jane Chiu, M.Sc., Zia A. Khan, Ph.D., Hana Farhangkhoee, M.Sc., Subrata Chakrabarti, M.D., Ph.D
Curcumin prevents diabetes-associated abnormalities in the kidneys by inhibiting p300 and nuclear factor-κB
Nutrition. Volume 25, Issue 9 , Pages 964-972, September 2009

D’Amico G, Gentile MG.
Effect of dietary manipulation on the lipid abnormalities and urinary protein loss in nephrotic patients.
Miner Electrolyte Metab. 1992;18(2-5):203-6.

Duffield JS, Hong S, Vaidya VS, Lu Y, Fredman G, Serhan CN, Bonventre JV.
Resolvin D series and protectin D1 mitigate acute kidney injury.
J Immunol. 2006 Nov 1;177(9):5902-11.

Gentile MG, Fellin G, Cofano F, Delle Fave A, Manna G, Ciceri R, Petrini C, Lavarda F, Pozzi F, D’Amico G.
Treatment of proteinuric patients with a vegetarian soy diet and fish oil.
Clin Nephrol. 1993 Dec;40(6):315-20.

Kalista-Richards M.
The kidney: medical nutrition therapy–yesterday and today.
Nutr Clin Pract. 2011 Apr;26(2):143-50. doi: 10.1177/0884533611399923.

Knight EL, Stampfer MJ, Hankinson SE, Spiegelman D, Curhan GC.
The impact of protein intake on renal function decline in women with normal renal function or mild renal insufficiency.
Ann Intern Med. 2003 Mar 18;138(6):460-7.

Martin WF, Armstrong LE, Rodriguez NR.
Dietary protein intake and renal function.
Nutr Metab (Lond). 2005 Sep 20;2:25.

Ogborn MR, Nitschmann E, Bankovic-Calic N, Weiler HA, Aukema HM.
Dietary soy protein benefit in experimental kidney disease is preserved after isoflavone depletion of diet.
Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2010 Nov;235(11):1315-20. doi: 10.1258/ebm.2010.010059. Epub 2010 Oct 4.

Rayner TE, Howe PR.
Purified omega-3 fatty acids retard the development of proteinuria in salt-loaded hypertensive rats.
J Hypertens. 1995 Jul;13(7):771-80.

Soroka N, Silverberg DS, Greemland M, Birk Y, Blum M, Peer G, Iaina A.
Comparison of a vegetable-based (soya) and an animal-based low-protein diet in predialysis chronic renal failure patients.
Nephron. 1998;79(2):173-80.

National Kidney Disease Education Program
http://nkdep.nih.gov/learn/keep-kidneys-healthy.shtml

Tack, Ivan MD, PhD
Effects of Water Consumption on Kidney Function and Excretion
Nutrition Today: November/December 2010 – Volume 45 – Issue 6 – pp S37-S40

Zararsiz I, Sonmez MF, Yilmaz HR, Tas U, Kus I, Kavakli A, Sarsilmaz M.
Effects of omega-3 essential fatty acids against formaldehyde-induced nephropathy in rats.
Toxicol Ind Health. 2006 Jun;22(5):223-9.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.
These products are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease.

Mineral Balance: Sodium-Potassium

sodium-potassium-scaleLike children on a see-saw, some minerals work to balance each other in the body. Almost everything in nature is about balance. In humans and animals it’s called homeostasis, which is the property of the body to maintain its internal environment in a stable, constant condition. Occasionally, mainstream medicine overlooks the balance aspect and tends to look at isolated parts and actions of the body. One of these oversights involves sodium and its relationship with potassium, working together as the sodium-potassium pump, which is the mechanism of active transport by which sodium and potassium ions are moved across the cell membrane, into and out of the cell. With the help of ATP as the source of energy, sodium is extruded from the cell and potassium is invited in. This energetic display is necessary for protein biosynthesis, maintenance of osmotic equilibrium, initiation of nerve impulses and transport of some other molecules, such as glucose, across the membrane. To clarify, ATP is a high-energy phosphate compound used by the body to get things done, including muscle contractions and enzyme metabolism, among others.

Sodium (Na) and potassium (K) are essential minerals and electrolytes. As the latter, they dissociate into ions (charged particles), allowing them to conduct electricity. In order for the body to function the right way, they need to be regulated on both sides of the cell membrane. The recommended intake of sodium had been 2300 milligrams a day, but is now 1500 mg/d; that for potassium being unchanged at 4700 mg/day. The sodium:potassium ratio, therefore, has moved from 1:2 to almost 1:3, which is closer to what is believed to be the body’s ideal. In plants, of which humans eat too few, the natural ratio of Na to K is about 1:10.

Sodium is the chief ion outside the cell, potassium inside. Inside the cell, sodium concentrations are ten times lower than outside. Potassium concentration inside are about thirty times higher than outside. The difference across the membrane creates an electrochemical gradient known as membrane potential, which uses a lot of the body’s energy to maintain itself. Without this tight control, muscles would suffer, especially the heart. In the typical American diet, intake of sodium (as sodium chloride) is three times higher than potassium, just the opposite of what it should be. The dietary guidelines for sodium consumption are currently being met by only a tiny percent of the population (Drewnowski, 2012)

Table salt is about 39% sodium. A simple explanation is that one teaspoon of salt, which has a mass about 6200 mg, contains approximately 2400 mg of sodium.

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), first conducted in the early 70’s, reported in 2012 that more than 90% of adults consumed more than 2300 mg/d of sodium a day, and less than 2%–that’s two percent—met the recommendation for potassium (Cogswell, 2012). It’s no small surprise that high blood pressure is rampant (Wenberger, 1986) (Elliot, 1991, 1996) (Dyer, 1995) (He, 2004) (Levings, 2012)  Of course, you could argue that the relationship of sodium intake to hypertension is a genetic matter, but do you know your genes?

Increasing potassium and reducing sodium intake will help to reduce blood pressure. But be careful not to overdo it by using supplements without strict supervision, since potassium overload is almost as bad as potassium deficiency. After all, potassium is used to stop the heart in lethal injections. Aiming for the recommended 4700 mg a day means that vegetables and fruit intake needs to go up, while intake of cakes, cookies and prepared foods needs to go down. Overdosing potassium from foods is almost impossible…you can’t eat that much food.

If less than 2% of Americans get the recommended amount of potassium, how much do we get?  From data collected in 2009-2010, women get about 50% of the RDI, men about 81% (USDA, 2012). Besides supporting coronary health, potassium seems to lower the risk of stroke (Ascherio, 1998) (Larsson, 2011). If you’ve got abnormally high urinary calcium levels, you might be looking at kidney stones in your future, something we wouldn’t wish on anyone.  Increasing dietary potassium levels by increasing fruit and vegetable intake has been found to decrease urinary calcium excretion. Taking a supplement under supervision will do the same thing. It has been found that getting more than 4000 mg of potassium a day reduces risk of kidney stones (Curhan, 2004).

Diuretics may lower potassium levels, but not all do, so check with your doctor to find out if your diuretic is potassium-sparing or not. Laxatives, caffeine, tobacco and lots of sugar may also compromise potassium stores. Physical and mental stress interferes with potassium metabolism. If you haven’t already, try to increase potassium foods, including sweet potatoes, bananas, tomatoes, oranges, beans, squashes, nuts and seeds, green foods, avocados, garlic and a host of other produce. Look here for a list:
http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixb.htm.

Look at both sodium and potassium in the context of what you eat every day and try to balance foods before you consider a potassium supplement. You know where most of the salt comes from (processed foods and the salt shaker), but you’ll have to read labels to find the rest. If you can maintain a ratio of one to one, you’ll be better off than most, but trying to get two to one, potassium to sodium, is preferred. Limiting sodium to about 500 mg in a meal is a virtuous endeavor. Look at some soup cans and you’ll see more than that in a tiny serving’s worth.  Even certain “light” soups have 650 mg of sodium in a 1-cup serving. Potassium values of these products are half that, which is the opposite of what it should be.  If the whole can is consumed, sodium-potassium balance needs to be addressed at other meals. Seeing kids unbalanced on a see-saw can be amusing. Viewing sodium-potassium balance from a gurney is not.

References

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The effects of potassium depletion and supplementation on blood pressure: a clinical review.
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Sodium and potassium intakes among US adults: NHANES 2003-2008.
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Curhan GC, Willett WC, Knight EL, Stampfer MJ.
Dietary factors and the risk of incident kidney stones in younger women: Nurses’ Health Study II.
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Reducing the sodium-potassium ratio in the US diet: a challenge for public health.
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Potassium, calcium, and magnesium intakes and risk of stroke in women.
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National Institute of Health
Jan. 26, 2009
Sodium/Potassium Ratio Linked to Cardiovascular Disease Risk
http://www.nih.gov/researchmatters/january2009/01262009hypertension.htm

Akira Okayama; Katsuyuki Miura; Tomonori Okamura; Nagako Okuda; Shigeyuki Saitoh; et al
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Quanhe Yang, PhD; Tiebin Liu, MSPH; Elena V. Kuklina, MD, PhD; et al.
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Lynn D. Silver, MD, MPH; Thomas A. Farley, MD, MPH
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Stofan JR, Zachwieja JJ, Horswill CA, Murray R, Anderson SA, Eichner E
Sweat and sodium losses in NCAA football players: a precursor to heat cramps?
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U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2012.
Total Nutrient Intakes: Percent Reporting and Mean Amounts of Selected Vitamins and Minerals from Food and Dietary
Supplements, by Family Income (as ! of Federal Poverty Threshold) and Age, What We Eat in America, NHANES 2009-2010. Available: www.ars.usda.gov/ba/bhnrc/fsrg.
USDA, Agricultural Research Services

USDA
Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005
Appendix B-1. Food Sources of Potassium
http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixb.htm

USDA. Downloadable pdf Tables.
What We Eat in America, 2009-2010.
http://www.ars.usda.gov/Services/docs.htm?docid=18349

Weinberger MH, Miller JZ, Luft FC, Grim CE, Fineberg NS.
Definitions and characteristics of sodium sensitivity and blood pressure resistance.
Hypertension. 1986 Jun;8(6 Pt 2):II127-34.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.
These products are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease.